My Fandom Blog...Oh, Heavens.

95,107 notes

blackvassal:

soulgems:

I was at main event today and when I was playing lazer tag this 10 year old boy ran up to me and told me I was ugly but I smiled and told him I thought he was very handsome and he blushed and apologized for insulting me then he protected me through the whole game and even shot his own teammates but the greatest part is that when his friend called him a traitor he rolled his eyes and turned to me and apologized for his friend being “a total noob”

children

(via no-more-rhymes-now-i-mean-it)

52 notes

carpeumbra:

carpeumbra:

Empty Chairs at Empty Tables is now part of my Novus Ordo playlist because it fits so perfectly for St. John because literally everyone died young from a violent death except him.

My namesake.

Brb sobbing into the night.

And it’s even more perfect because at the end of the 1st century, Christianity was taking a fall because all the Apostles were scared toward the end of their life. Christ said He was going to be back soon and would live within their lifetime. They had so much faith, so much passion, more than anyone St. John who had visions of the end of days and to whom was entrusted the Mother of God, who lived near her until her Assumption and Coronation (SIT DOWN prosperosfootnotes), so imagine being the only one of your friends you’ve known since you were barely a man, a young teenager, and everyone you loved since that time left you mostly by violent death such as suicide, murder, or made martyrs.

And then walking into Jerusalem, seeing the new leadership rising around you, thinking you’re the most powerful and brilliant man on the whole of the Earth. You see the budding revolution among the Jews who will soon fight their oppressors in the coming century. You see everyone dying around you throughout the Mediterranean from plague and war.

 And then walking into the room where they mourned with the Lord, where you were the only one who knew besides Jesus that Judas was the one who would betray him, and seeing the room barren and empty, abandoned besides a few pilgrims praying in the shadows in awe, trying to imagine what you know intimately, knowing that no longer will any of your friends are to meet there ever again.

And that once you leave the room, it will be the last time an Apostle will ever have been in the room.

tagging millennialgospel

(via millennialgospel)

1,836 notes

Love your material. Nothing frightens the inner critic more than the writer who loves her work. The writer who is enamored of her material forgets all about censoring herself. She doesn’t stop to wonder if her book is any good, or who will publish it, or what people will think. She writes in a trance, losing track of time, hearing only her characters in her head.
(via briannahopealbers)

(Source: ellenkushner, via sarahtaylorgibson)

28,410 notes

Film Meme [ 6 ] Underrated or Unappreciated Films
→ [ 6 ] Treasure Planet (2002) "Now, you listen to me, James Hawkins: you got the makings of greatness in you.  But you got to take the helm and chart your own course. Stick to it, no matter the squalls! And when the time comes you get the chance to really test the cut of your sails, and show what you’re made of — well, I hope I’m there, catching some of the light coming off you that day."

(via catieinabox)

2,700 notes

laureninspace:

npr:

A couple months back I helped brainstorm with NPR’s On The Media for their Breaking News Consumer’s Handbook, a basic guide on how to maintain a healthy skepticism when news orgs are covering a breaking news event. There’s been no shortage of major mistakes made by the media in recent years - Gabby Giffords, the Boston Bombing, Newtown, just to name a few - and there’s a lot we can do as news consumers to scrutinize what’s been reported.
This got me thinking about the tropes commonly used by journalists during breaking news  and what they really mean. Last month  I started documenting the terminology often used during a breaking news broadcast, and now I’ve made a matrix out of it. Each phrase is placed on the matrix based on how credible a report is, and how likely it is that a reporter feels secure if they actually say it on air. For example, if you say “Other networks are reporting,” it suggests you don’t necessarily know any facts yet, and that you’re deflecting blame from yourself to those other networks if it turns out to be wrong. Meanwhile, if you say “Multiple independent sources have confirmed…” it expresses more certitude, both in terms of the facts and your professional security if you go public with it - especially when you name those sources and explain how they came upon that information.
Anyway, this is my second draft of the matrix, and I’d love to get your thoughts on it. Thanks! - @acarvin

There have been times when I’ve set out to write something, used one of the phrases in the lower left quadrant and just… changed my mind.

laureninspace:

npr:

A couple months back I helped brainstorm with NPR’s On The Media for their Breaking News Consumer’s Handbook, a basic guide on how to maintain a healthy skepticism when news orgs are covering a breaking news event. There’s been no shortage of major mistakes made by the media in recent years - Gabby Giffords, the Boston Bombing, Newtown, just to name a few - and there’s a lot we can do as news consumers to scrutinize what’s been reported.

This got me thinking about the tropes commonly used by journalists during breaking news  and what they really mean. Last month I started documenting the terminology often used during a breaking news broadcast, and now I’ve made a matrix out of it. Each phrase is placed on the matrix based on how credible a report is, and how likely it is that a reporter feels secure if they actually say it on air. For example, if you say “Other networks are reporting,” it suggests you don’t necessarily know any facts yet, and that you’re deflecting blame from yourself to those other networks if it turns out to be wrong. Meanwhile, if you say “Multiple independent sources have confirmed…” it expresses more certitude, both in terms of the facts and your professional security if you go public with it - especially when you name those sources and explain how they came upon that information.

Anyway, this is my second draft of the matrix, and I’d love to get your thoughts on it. Thanks! - @acarvin

There have been times when I’ve set out to write something, used one of the phrases in the lower left quadrant and just… changed my mind.

(via sneaky-little-hobbitses)

241,152 notes

greekmythlulz:

whitedarryl:

asatira:

elfgrove:

mmemento:

leaper182:

bead-bead:

the-writers-ramblings:

i cant even make it past the table of contents im laughing too hard

WHAT IS THIS BOOK!?!

It’s called “Zeus Grants Stupid Wishes: A No-Bullshit Guide to World Mythology”
By Cory O’Brien, and it looks highly entertaining. :D

Gilgamesh: THE ULTIMATE BROMANCE

Give it here, now.

Sweet Fluffy Gods why is there not an audiobook version?

I need to find this book.

The first time Iv’e wanted to read something since Metro 2033.

Oh my Gods NEED!

(Source: thewritersramblings, via cutestforlife)